• PJ Sherman

How to get yourself out of a writing slump - You deserve positivity!

If you're like me and any other writer in the history of humanity, then you will have had a writing slump at some point. If you haven't - congratulations, you're an android and I'm very jealous of you.


As you're aware, these 'slumps' can be severely damaging to your confidence and can even put doubts into your mind as to whether you should even continue in your writing career (or in general, if you do it for fun.)


DRUMROLL PLEASE!


After receiving a request from a reader, I've decided to put together a list of things I do when the slump monster creeps in. And no, one of them doesn't include drinking copious amounts of energy drink (no name dropping here - there aren't any royalties!) Try some of the ideas from my list and let me know how you got on. Also, please let us know if you have any of your own to share - I'd love to hear them!


1) Write. Write. Write. - Okay, okay. Stop shouting at me! I know this may sound silly, but the most effective method I have when I'm in a slump is to just sit down and write. Anything. Absolutely anything! Describe the desk in front of me; talk about my day; detail the intricacies of a stained tea cup. Okay, that last one was a bit odd, but you get what I mean now. Sometimes, the process of writing jolts something in your brain and you start to feel great, as that creative barrier begins to fall away, brick by brick. It's so liberating - pick up your pen now and start writing!


2) Listen to Music - There have been studies that show listening to music affects brain waves, which results in increased cognitive function. So, if your brain is happy, you're happy (ignore the childish thought process here...) I also feel inspired when listening to music as I'm a very visual person, so whenever I have music playing, I visualise a story or video. That interpretation in my mind's eye has given me many ideas for creative writing projects. Try it!


3) Talk to People - As writers, we're known to be introverted creatures. Yes, you're an amazing, introverted creature! You should put that on your CV or LinkedIn profile. Anyway, I digress... What I've found most useful in writing accurate characters and dialogue is to talk to random people; if you're standing in line for a coffee, strike up a conversation with the person eagerly looking at the cakes; waiting at traffic lights? Then make a comment about the weather at someone and note their reaction; Sat in an Uber? DO have a conversation with your driver. You'll be amazed how different we all are, what makes us tick and that enriching insight will provide you with resources to plow into your next amazing project for a character or story!


My final command to you...


Don't you dare put down that pen or stop typing on your keyboard! You will beat that slump monster! Your work is wanted by this world and you have all of us behind you, daring you to do better and to continue enjoying what you do.

 

Subscribe Form

©2020 by PJ Sherman